SNAPP TEAM:Andean Camelid Disease
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What management actions will promote both human livelihoods and the health of vicuñas and guanacos, in the face of disease and other threats?
Team Status: NEW
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals

 

 

 

  • Promote science-based knowledge to overcome the myths regarding mange disease and management
  • Collate and compare mange severity, impact, and management data across the range
  • Identify potential common predictors of severe mange infestations
  • Develop a framework to facilitate holistic data sharing across the livestock-wildlife-human sectors
  • Develop ecologically informed management plans that mitigate disease impacts by informing and supporting central animal health agencies
Team
Leaders
Chris Walzer
Wildlife Conservation Society
Paul Cross
USGS
Mariana Montoya
Wildlife Conservation Society
Members
Alynn Martin
USGS
Brandie Fariss
University of Massachusetts - Amherst/TNC
Fabian Beltran
Wildlife Conservation Society
Jose Mena
Wildlife Conservation Society
Kaitlyn Gaynor
NCEAS
Robert Wallace
Wildlife Conservation Society
Steve Smith
Vetmed Vienna
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SNAPP TEAM:Wildfires and Human Health
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What are consensus-driven, evidence-based approaches to identify and communicate the human health implications of wildfires versus ecological restoration-focused forest management, including managed fires?
Team Status: NEW
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals
Team
Leaders
June Spector
University of Washington
Jen Krenz
University of Washington
Ryan Haugo
The Nature Conservancy
Nick Wolff
The Nature Conservancy
Members
Ana Barros
Washington State Department of Natural Resources
Andrew Merschel
Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University
Blane Heumann
The Nature Conservancy
Brian Robinson
McGill University
Carolyn Whitaker
Washington State Department of Labor and Industries
Charles Maxwell
Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University
Chris Tessum
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Craig Clements
San Jose State University
David Grant
Washington State Department of Ecology
Eddie Kasner
Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center, University of Washington
Ernesto Alvarado
Pacific Wildland Fire Sciences Laboratory, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington
Fay Johnston
Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania
Gillian Gawne-Mittelstaedt
Partnership for Air Matters, Tribal Healthy Homes Network
Haiganoush Preisler
(Retired) USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station
James Markwiese
US Environmental Protection Agency
Jamie Lydersen
California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection
Janice Peterson
USDA Forest Service
Jens Stevens
New Mexico Landscapes Field Station, USGS
Jihoon Jung
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington
Jill Baumgartner
McGill University
Julian Marshall
University of Washington
Julie Fox
Washington State Department of Health
Karen Zirkle
Washington State Department of Natural Resources
Kari Nadeau
Stanford University Medical School
Keala Hagmann
Applegate Forestry, LLC
Kerry Metlen
The Nature Conservancy
Leland Tarnay
USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region Remote Sensing Lab
Mary Prunicki
Stanford University Medical School
Meg Krawchuk
Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University
Miriam Marlier
University of California, Los Angeles
Paul Hessburg
USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station
Pete Caligiuri
The Nature Conservancy
Phil Levin
College of the Environment, University of Washington and The Nature Conservancy
Sarah Henderson
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia
Sean Hopkins
Washington State Department of Ecology
Stacy Drury
Fire and Fuels Program, USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station
Susan Prichard
USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station
Tania Busch Isaksen
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington
Van Kane
College of the Environment, University of Washington
Vanessa Galaviz
California Environmental Protection Agency
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SNAPP TEAM:Saving Our Rivers
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Can we transition the power sector to reliable renewable energy sources without damming the world's remaining free-flowing rivers critical for freshwater biodiversity and people's livelihoods?
Team Status: NEW
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals

 

Team
Leaders
Eilyan Bitar
School of Electrical & Computer Engineering Cornell University
Jeff Opperman
Global Science, WWF
Joe Kiesecker
Land & Water Conservation Science, TNC
Members
Alex Flecker
Ecology & Evolution Biology, Cornell University
Christian Contreras Otiniano
TNC, North Andes & South Central America
Daniel Kammen
Renewable & Appropriate Energy Laboratory, School of Public Policy University of California, Berkeley
Grace Wu
University of California Davis, TNC, The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Juliana Delgado
TNC, North Andes & South Central America
Mariana Montoya
Wildlife Conservation Society Peru
Mariana Varese
Wildlife Conservation Society Amazonia
Rafael Almeida
Ecology & Evolution Biology, Cornell University
Rafael Schmitt
The Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University, California
Ruth Tiffer Sotomayor
Environment & Natural Resources, World Bank
Vijay Modi
Millennium Villages Project, Columbia University
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SNAPP TEAM:Conservation Aquaculture
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What are the social and ecological trade-offs of using aquaculture as a conservation tool for marine foundation species, and what are the responsible methods for using this approach?
Team Status: NEW
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals

 

 

 

Team
Leaders
April Ridlon
Science for Nature and People Partnership / National Center for Ecological Analysis & Synthesis
Kerstin Wasson
Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
Edwin Grosholz
University of California, Davis
Tiffany Waters
Global Aquaculture, The Nature Conservancy
Members
Betsy Peabody
Puget Sound Restoration Fund
Boze Hancock
Global Reefs, The Nature Conservancy
Chela Zabin
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Danielle Zacherl
California State University, Fullerton
Diego Lirman
University of Miami
Elizabeth Tobin
Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe
Gary Fleener
Hog Island Oyster Co.
Halley Froehlich
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara
Jamie Donatuto
Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
John Adams
Sound Fresh Clams and Oysters
Joseph Pollock
Caribbean Division, The Nature Conservancy
Julio Lorda
Universidad Autónoma de Baja California
Madhavi Colton
Coral Reef Alliance
Mark Bitter
University of Chicago
Michael Tlusty
University of Massachusetts
Rhona Govender
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Steve Rumrill
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
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SNAPP TEAM:Climate Resilient Fisheries
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What key features support fisheries’ resilience to climate change impacts, and how can these features be recognized and enhanced in marine fishery management systems?
Team Status: NEW
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals

 

Team
Leaders
Kathy Mills
Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Kristin Kleisner
Environmental Defense Fund
Patrick Sullivan
Cornell University
Members
Anne Hollowed
NOAA, Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Chris Free
University of California, Santa Barbara
Christopher Golden
Harvard University
Claudio Silva
Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso
Eddie Allison
Nippon Foundation Ocean Nexus Program and Worldfish
Gaku Ishimura
Iwate University
George Freduah
Sustainability Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast
Gretta Pecl
University of Tasmania
Jacob Eurich
University of California, Santa Barbara
Jacqueline Lau
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University; WorldFish
Jono Wilson
The Nature Conservancy; University of California, Santa Barbara
Kanae Tokunaga
Gulf of Maine Research Institute
Mark Dickey-Collas
ICES
Merrick Burden
Environmental Defense Fund
Mireia Valle
NCEAS and University of California, Santa Barbara
Whitney Friedman
NCEAS and University of California, Santa Barbara
Willow Battista
Environmental Defense Fund
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SNAPP TEAM:Coastal Outcomes
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When does coastal conservation produce positive outcomes for people and nature, and what are the co-benefits and tradeoffs between multiple outcomes?

In coastal ecosystems, scientists and managers often encourage the use of marine protected areas (MPAs) and other effective area-based conservation measures (OECMs) in order to provide both ecological and social benefits. This group is assessing the social, ecological, and political conditions in which the use of MPAs and OECMs are associated with positive outcomes for both people and nature, as well as the synergies and trade-offs that exist between multiple outcomes.

OUR APPROACHUsing data from seven coastal countries in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, we will identify how MPAs and OECMs contribute to successful outcomes under different political, social, and economic conditions, and will translate the results into a tool to help managers make related decisions in the future.

Team Status: ONGOING
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals

 

Team
Leaders
Emily Darling
Wildlife Conservation Society
Georgina Gurney
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University
Members
Amelia Wenger
University of Queensland
Arun Agrawal
University of Michigan
Courtney Cox
RARE and Alliance for Conservation Evidence
David Gill
Duke University
Derek Armitage
University of Waterloo
Elizabeth McLeod
The Nature Conservancy
Estradiveri
World Wildlife Fund
Gabby Ahmadia
World Wildlife Fund and Alliance for Conservation Evidence
Gavin McDonald
University of California, Santa Barbara
Graham Epstein
University of Waterloo and Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs
Harry Jonas
IUCN, WCPA Task Force on OECMs
Irfan Yulianto
Wildlife Conservation Society Indonesia
Jessica Blythe
Brock University
Joachim Claudet
French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and Laboratoire d'Excellence CORAIL
Natalie Ban
University of Victoria
Nyawira Muthiga
Wildlife Conservation Society
Peni Lestari
Wildlife Conservation Society Indonesia
Ravaka Ranaivoson
Wildlife Conservation Society
Sangeeta Mangubhai
Wildlife Conservation Society
Stacy Jupiter
Wildlife Conservation Society
Stephanie D’agata
Macquarie University
Stuart Campbell
RARE Indonesia
Tim McClanahan
Wildlife Conservation Society
Vera Agostini
FAO
Whitney Friedman
NCEAS and University of California, Santa Barbara
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SNAPP TEAM:Steppe Health
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Can diverse stakeholders stop a fatal viral epidemic threatening endangered wildlife and livestock critical to over half the people in Mongolia?

Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an extremely contagious viral disease that is spreading into new regions across the globe, causing devastating socio-economic losses and serious damage to the livelihoods, food security, and nutrition for millions of small-scale farmers and pastoralists. In Mongolia, the effects of the epidemic have been particularly dire. In August 2016, PPR killed thousands of head of livestock, despite widespread vaccination. The disease also impacted wildlife, killing more than 50 percent of the critically endangered Mongolian saiga antelope in less than two months. This catastrophic loss of wildlife also caused immediate consequences for other endangered animals, including snow leopards that depend on wild ungulates for food.

 

OUR APPROACH: Along with livestock health authorities, herders, biologists, wildlife health specialists, international aid organizations and conservation NGOs, the working group will seek new ideas to free the country’s wildlife, economy, and livelihoods from this disease, and explore options for integrated management of wildlife and livestock health.

Team Status: ONGOING
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals
Key Products
PPR virus threatens wildlife conservation

The circulation of PPR in Asia has grave consequences in wildlife populations already struggling with overhunting, poaching, livestock competition, and climatic events. We urgently need more PPR surveillance and wildlife protection measures.

Outbreak of Peste des Petits Ruminants among Critically Endangered Mongolian Saiga and Other Wild Ungulates

In this piece, published by the CDC, the authors determine that the mass mortality of both wildlife and domestic ungulates was caused by the introduction of the peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV).

Eradication of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus and the Wildlife-Livestock Interface

The team  published a framework that lays the foundation for eradicating PPRV in a five-year period by covering four major components.

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Team
Leaders
Amanda Fine
Wildlife Conservation Society
Enkhtuvshin Shiiledgdamba
Wildlife Conservation Society
Members
Andy Dobson
Princeton University
Bayarjargal Yunden
The Nature Conservancy
Bodisaikhan Khishgee
Veterinary and Animal Breeding Agency, Ministry of Food, Agriculture & Light Industry
Chimiddorj Buyannemekh
WWF Mongolia
Felix Njeumi
UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
Jamiyankhuu Narmandakh
Dept of Environment & Natural Resources, Ministry of Environment & Tourism
Jeffery Mariner
Tufts University
Lhagvasuren Badamjav
Mongolian Academy of Sciences
Mathieu Pruvot
Wildlife Conservation Society
Richard Kock
Royal Veterinary College, University of London
Véronique Chevalier
French Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD)
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SNAPP TEAM:Appalachian Coalfields
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How can economic development, human well-being, and environmental sustainability be balanced in the Central Appalachian Coalfields region?

Thriving mining, forestry, agriculture and chemical industries once supported local economies in the Central Appalachian Coalfields region. This region that covers Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia remains among the most impoverished areas in the United States, and local concern about the economic impact of phasing-out coal as an energy source is far from groundless. However, the region is well-positioned to embrace a vibrant, diverse economy including manufacturing, service industries, renewable energy development, tourism, and a revived forest products industry.

 

OUR APPROACH: Experts in economic modeling, rural sociology, ecology, forestry, tourism, and policy, are collaborating with local practitioners of community economic development who understand the unique culture, opportunities, and constraints of the Central Appalachian Coalfields.

This team is made possible in part by the generous support of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (www.ddcf.org). The mission of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation is to improve the quality of people’s lives through grants supporting the performing arts, environmental conservation, medical research and child well-being, and through the preservation of the cultural and environmental legacy of Doris Duke’s properties.

Team Status: ONGOING
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals

 

Team
Leaders
Judy Dunscomb
The Nature Conservancy
Mark Anderson
The Nature Conservancy
Randall W. Jackson
West Virginia University
Members
Beth Wheatley
The Nature Conservancy
Brad Kreps
The Nature Conservancy
Brandon Dennison
Coalfield Development Corporation
Campbell Moore
The Nature Conservancy
Danna Baxley
The Nature Conservancy
Josh Bills
Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED)
Leslie Ferguson-Oles
Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED)
Michael P. Strager
West Virginia University
Sally Palmer
The Nature Conservancy
Thomas Ochuodho
University of Kentucky
William Norman
Clemson University
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SNAPP TEAM:Water Flow Impact
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How can short and long term source water protection programs alleviate the risks posed by both water shortages and excess water?

Maintaining reliable freshwater flows is essential for human health and well-being, sustainable economic development, and ecological integrity. This means a minimum amount of water in our rivers and streams during dry seasons, and high flows that are within natural ranges of variation during wet seasons. Floods and droughts are expected to increase with continued shifts in climate. To effectively implement the right actions in the right places in specific watersheds, we need to understand how and where different source water protection actions can contribute to achieving reliable freshwater flows.

 

OUR APPROACH: To address this issue, this team brings together hydrology and adaptation experts to examine the science, and then work with stakeholder group representatives to interpret the meaning of that science through the lens of those groups: downstream utilities and municipal managers, humanitarian groups working with upstream communities, and aquatic ecologists.

This project is funded in part by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF7100 to The Nature Conservancy to support the work of the Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP).

Team Status: ONGOING
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals
Team
Leaders
Kari Vigerstol
The Nature Conservancy
Adrian Vogl
Stanford University
Robin Abell
Conservation International
Members
Albert van Dijk
Australia National University
Bernardete Neves
Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO)
Bert de Bievre
Fondo para la protección del Agua (FONAG)
Daniela Giardina
Oxfam
David Wilk
Inter-American Development Bank (IADB)
Jan Cassin
ForestTrends
Jeanne Nel
Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
John Matthews
Alliance for Global Water Adaptation
Kate Brauman
University of Minnesota
Katharine Cross
International Water Association
Kris Johnson
The Nature Conservancy
Louise Stafford
The Nature Conservancy
Maija Bertule
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)- DHI
Neil McIntyre
University of Queensland
Paul Hicks
Catholic Relief Services
Rob Wilby
Loughborough University
Robert Stallard
U.S. Geological Survey
Suzanne Ozment
World Resources Institute
Ted Grantham
University of California, Berkeley
Tom Gleeson
University of Victoria
Wouter Buytaert
Imperial College
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SNAPP TEAM:Water Sanitation and Nature
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How can nature-based interventions be used to help billions of people access sanitation and higher quality water?

There are 2.4 billion people living without sufficient sanitation to separate them from their biological waste. For another 2.1 billion, wastewater drains directly into surface waters. Despite improvements over past decades, unsafe management of fecal waste and wastewater still presents a major risk to public health and the environment. Natural solutions including constructed and natural wetlands, wastewater treatment ponds, and green roofs can be part of wastewater treatment systems to support the removal of wastewater contaminants such as bacteria, heavy metals and high levels of nutrients.

 

OUR APPROACH: This working group is developing an evidence-based guidance document which assesses both the technical feasibility and practicality of placing effective nature-based sanitation solutions in diverse local and cultural contexts. Their aim is to provide information which can inform investment and resource use in operation and maintenance of sanitation services which serves both human and ecosystem health.

This team is made possible in part by the generous support and engagement of the Bridge Collaborative, uniting experts in health, development and the environment to create the evidence and opportunity to solve big problems for people and the world we share.

Team Status: ONGOING
Team Critical Challenge:
Goals
Key Products
Embedding nature-based solutions into circular economies

Five working groups are using COST Action to test using “a circular flow system that implements NBS for managing nutrients and resources within the urban biosphere.” They will work with professionals in urban water, resource recovery, and urban farming to better understand the socio-economic impacts of their work.

Facilitating nature-based solutions for urban water sanitation

This report includes guidelines for water districts to use nature-based methods for urban water sanitation, including when and where certain methods are appropriate, and their limitations.

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Team
Leaders
Katharine Cross
International Water Association
Nathan Karres
The Nature Conservancy
Rob McDonald
The Nature Conservancy
Members
Anacleto Rizzo
IRIDRA
Andrews Jacob
Consortium for DEWATS Dissemination Society
Bernhard Pucher
BOKU University
Darja Istenič
University of Ljubljana
Fabio Masi
IRIDRA
Florent Chazarenc
Institut national de recherche en sciences et technologies pour l'environnement et l'agriculture (IRSTEA)
Ganapathy Ganeshan
Consortium for DEWATS Dissemination Society
Günter Langergraber
BOKU University
Joaquim Comas
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA)
Justin Abbott
Arup Group
Katharina Tondera
Institut national de recherche en sciences et technologies pour l'environnement et l'agriculture (IRSTEA)
Laura Castanares
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA)
Lisa Andrews
LMA Water Consulting
Lluis Corominas
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA)
Natasa Atanasova
University of Ljubljana
Robert Gearheart
Humboldt State University
Robert K Bastian
US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Rohini Pradeep
Consortium for DEWATS Dissemination Society
Rose Kaggwa
National Water and Sewerage Corporation, Uganda
Sara Mason
Bridge Collaborative
Stefan Reuter
Bremen Overseas Research and Development Association (BORDA)
Stephanie Wear
The Nature Conservancy
Tjaša Griessler Bulc
University of Ljubljana
Vicenç Acuña
Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA)
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