SNAPP TEAM:Open Ocean Aquaculture
Support SNAPP
Teams Like This
Our Challenge
How can aquaculture meet growing demand for seafood while being environmentally sustainable?

Aquaculture now produces more than half of all fisheries products directly consumed by people, and demand is only expected to increase. One of the biggest potential areas for growth is open-ocean aquaculture. To provide guidance on how this sector can develop sustainably, this team is examining the ecological, economic and social constraints and opportunities for the industry, placing aquaculture into the broader food system and ocean planning contexts. The group is also working to inform and influence offshore aquaculture development in several countries.

Team Status
ONGOING
Team Critical Challenge
Solutions

The aquaculture business sector can use fish ecology to increase profit and must launch a campaign to alleviate non-fact-based fears of pollution.

Note: All linked solutions below will open in a new tab.

Changing public perceptions of aquaculture from 1984-2015
(PLOS ONE)
Peer-reviewed paper
Mariculture study examines species’ trade-offs
(Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment)
News coverage
Mariculture study examines species' trade-offs
(Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment)
News coverage
Offshore aquaculture: I know it when I see it
(Frontiers in Marine Science)
Peer-reviewed paper
Seafood for thought Blog
Snapshot of aquaculture species’ sustainability and tolerance to changing conditions
(Aquaculture)
Peer-reviewed paper
Study indicates improving perceptions of aquaculture
(Global Aquaculture Alliance)
News coverage
Team Leaders
Ben Halpern
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara
Dietmar Grimm
The Nature Conservancy
Team Members
Halley Froehlich
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), University of California, Santa Barbara
Michael Parke
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Mike Rust
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Mike Velings
Aqua-Spark
Peter Kareiva
University of California, Los Angeles
Rebecca Gentry
University of California, Santa Barbara
Roz Naylor
Stanford University
TOP